Women in philanthropy by Pam Booker, president, Georgia College Alumni Association Board of Directors

Women in philanthropy by Pam Booker, president, Georgia College Alumni Association Board of Directors

A s we celebrate National Women’s History Month, it’s a perfect time to reflect on the impact of women’s contributions to philanthropy. It is estimated that women account for over 60 percent of all charitable monetary giving.

Pam Booker
Pam Booker

Historically, philanthropy has been expressed through the giving of monetary donations. However, today philanthropic acts are demonstrated in the giving of a person’s resources in diverse ways, which may include their time, skills and expertise for the betterment of humanity.

Melinda Gates stated, “Philanthropy is not about the money. It’s about using whatever resources you have at your fingertips and applying them to improving the world.”

There are countless examples of women using whatever is at their disposal to help towards the resolution of a need. 

“As women who are achieving great success, not just in the marketplace but in our communities, churches and homes, we should never lose focus of the impact our philanthropic gifts have in the lives of people who are recipients of our generosity. Whether it is the establishing of scholarships, monetary donations to various projects, or giving non-tangible resources, each of us can be a philanthropist. It’s not the amount that makes the difference, it’s the motive of our hearts and the strategic, intentional and consistent dedication to making an impact.”
– Pam Booker

I believe anyone can be a philanthropist, but philanthropy starts in the heart. It is intentional, purposeful and strategic. Compassion and a heart for those who, many times through no fault of their own, find themselves in situations requiring assistance, becomes the driving force for the giving of one’s money and resources.

As I reflect on my own charitable giving and acts of service, I give because I believe “to whom much is given, much is required.” I have been the recipient of a wealth of love, support and encouragement. There have been both women and men who have poured into my life. I have many examples of women who are intentional with their giving to various causes, but the woman that best exemplifies philanthropic giving is my mother, Irene Booker. She is my role model for philanthropy.  She is consistent and strategic in the giving of financial support and resources—time, talent, expertise—to causes that burn deep within her heart. It is because of my parents that I too have a deep desire to make an impact through philanthropic acts. 

GC students at the Elevator Pitch competition.
GC students at the Elevator Pitch competition.

As women who are achieving great success, not just in the marketplace but in our communities, churches and homes, we should never lose focus of the impact our philanthropic gifts have in the lives of people who are recipients of our generosity. Whether it is the establishing of scholarships, monetary donations to various projects, or giving non-tangible resources, each of us can be a philanthropist. It’s not the amount that makes the difference, it’s the motive of our hearts and the strategic, intentional and consistent dedication to making an impact.

“Success isn’t about how much money you make. It’s about the difference you make in people’s lives,” said Michelle Obama, former first lady of the United States of America.